My 1 month success, experiences and observations

#1

TL:DR - Skip to bottom for results.

I’ve been a little confused about sites like this that actively promote using Apple Cider Vinegar and Baking Soda, introducing foreign oils into the scalp etc… It’s all a bit counter intuitive no?
The whole point of no-poo is to reduce the washes by training your scalp to ‘fend for itself’ more often, thus in turn, using less mixtures on your scalp that can leave damaging residue and otherwise screw with your hairs natural ecosystem?


What are you putting on your head???

Baking Soda is harsh on hair, period. It strips the hair bare; This is something you use ‘once in a blue moon/year’ type thing to ‘reset’ your hair and scalp It damages the hair, it dries and can destroy the scalp over long periods of use, even more so, if your using it on a frequent basis.
Ladies, you should know baking soda intimately, it’s a fantastic cleaning product labelled ‘white gold’ for a reason, it will chew through limescale, eat the most stubborn pan grease etc, it can outperform even the most destructive oven cleaners: Why? Just why?

Vinegar doesn’t fill the void from Baking Soda’s destructive nature; You want to bring the PH of your scalp back towards it’s natural acidity level, not increase the acidity or nuke it entirely with other products, if you use Vinegar, you need to use something to counteract the acidity. Too acidic and the natural bacteria can’t do its job and you kill it off, too neutral/alkaline and the bacteria runs absolutely rampant, it smells, it’s horrible, nooo.

NOTE: Adding oils as barmy as it sounds if you must, comes with it’s own risk. It’s alright going “use coconut oil” but which one, coconut oils on the market come in a range of designs, some are highly alkaline and some are highly acidic… And some are ‘just right’ - Make sure you get the appropriate one for the task. Make a shopping plan for your ingredients.

This could explain why so many people we’re having long-term bad experiences, or prolonged periods of recovery (only takes one swim in a chlorine filled pool to throw everything into chaos; Swim hats!).
I’m no ‘rocket scientist’, but it all makes sense to me, feel free to correct me, I am human after all, mistakes may be made.


So… I started with something simple… Cornflour, a plastic comb.
Why? Animal dust baths. Chickens do it, dogs do it, horses, rodents, even monkeys do it, so there must be some sense to it… Because they all look fabulous at the end of the day.
It binds to the grease, it dries out, falls out, it’s a simple, cheap, and not aggressive on the scalp.
Cornflour is also the main ingredient in a lot of dry shampoos, bundled along with other chemicals. Though, I imagine any fine and fairly neutral PH (6~8) flour would work.

So… Let’s give it a go!
Note: My hair would need washing every day prior to this, it was a grease producing monster.

The first week or two was a nightmare!!!
I’d go from putting way too much into my roots just to make the hair feel clean. This caused a clumping of cornflour and grease on my scalp, clogging everything up. But… Putting too little in and I looked like I had escaped a mental institution in the middle of a rainy night.
Did notice if I turned ‘white’, a spray of water on the top of the head and a comb-in, does wonders for hiding that flour. Smells a bit, but nothing too obvious.
…But I set myself a limit; At least one month, maybe there is some sense to this.

Second week ponders.
The itching was annoying, many wet-finger scalp massages, the scalp flaked, it was horrendous… I started getting in-grown hairs… I cursed… A lot. I did get some relief just tying it up into a ponytail (no one else could tell the difference). Hair started to get very thick, very heavy, very fast. Maybe I should give up… I said a month, ugh, push on.

Third week; things started to change.
Literally one day overnight, I started to notice my hair was lighter, softer, it felt better. It wasn’t perfect, but something was going on. Obviously at this point, my scalp was adjusting it’s new ecosystem.
I started using less cornflour on the roots, if at all, only rubbing it in my hands and working the strands. The scalp started to calm right down, less cornflour residue, the scalp could breathe, the flaking started to stop, no itching at all.
The ingrown hairs; no new occurrences, not a single one. There’s quite a bit of hair breakage from combing (still less than a shower would produce).
The hairs developing it’s own soft curly personality and put on volume; No smell. It’s certainly a learning curve it seems.

Forth week; routine!
Nights: Flour up the strands > sleep.
Mornings: Light flouring on the strands to take away any greasy feeling + what I call ‘heat treatment’ here and there.
Heat seems to work well with grease, hair straighteners (<170: Low as mine can go) seem ensure the grease is distributed fully along the strands, when it cools, the hairs a lot more manageable, brush-able etc. It also brings those greys into submission, otherwise they stick out like a wonky wire brush.
I prefer the straighteners, because I like my hair straight, it’s below my shoulders and curly hair just ‘gets in my face’ too much when I’m doing what I do. Straight hair just tucks away behind the ear nicely.

Fifth week+; Pretty much done…
It feels softer, stronger, etc. Still got a bit of frizz up top that pops up like I’ve been dragged out of an anime, but it seems to be going down some, maybe that bit just needs more time, or maybe, that’s just my hairs unique quirk [shrugs]. I did notice the lack of static when combing, and a bit of colour occurring in the hair itself (It was really dark with the greys standing out like an eyesore). Might actually get the courage to pop down to a hairdresser, since it’s not been to a hairdressers in years.
1 month, almost an 1 inch of hair growth, not bad.
All in all, the hair doesn’t feel ‘poo-clean’, it doesn’t feel remotely horrible either, and, has started to develop a nice sheen - Getting a lot of compliments.

Honestly, I’m happy with it and will continue to work on it - How’s that for “no poo”?
Result: https://prntscr.com/mr98oz
Excuse the red face, fell asleep in the sun yesterday … (>.<)

Edit: Sooo happy, scalps covered up nicely, no longer think I’m going bald, Super manageable. Worth it.

Water Only for 3 Months. Will it change?
#2

I am about six months in. I completely agree that the ecosystem on the scalp and hair is something I noticed and tried to not keep it from its natural course too much.

I started water only with occasional scalp scrubs, oil treatments and diluted ACV sprays. I started feeling these should be rare/as needed treatments instead of bi monthly or monthly.

Now I feel I want to keep it simpler.

I am doing the dry shampoo (corn starch) as needed and light oils (not heavy oil treatments) or cocoa butter for tips only as needed. So far best results.

And yes! I noticed too when straightening my hair has helped distribute the oil and looked better than days I used shampoo/conditioner/heat products.

Your hair looks way better than my first month, good job! :slight_smile:

#3

Think the biggest changes I’ve noticed;
a) When my hair does get a little bit greasy - I’m no longer clawing like a rabid animal at my itchy scalp within 24 hours (or at all anymore).
b) The dandruff has just fwoosh, gone, completely.
c) Hair’s thickened right up at the scalp, previously thought I was going bald with how much of my scalp was exposed, especially my crown.

Certainly a learning experience, totally worth the first month of hellish mess and torture… I got my routine down now, honestly couldn’t be happier. =3

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#4

Hi I’m new to this. I’m noticing my hair thinning terribly at crown and high fore head. I was told to try our olive oil soap and nothing else. Or should I go straight for the no poo and use just water. I’ve frizzy curly hair which is terribly thin. Will take all advise please xx

#5

Honestly, I’m no expert. But if you’re trying one thing and it’s not working, try another thing, stick at it for a few months and see if there is any difference; I decided just to dive right in and crash-course my scalp and beat it senseless with cornflour.

My first month was a nightmare, my second was just constant improvement, and now other than the odd flour dusting every few days, I don’t need to play with my hair as much to make it manageable. I still ‘wash’ it on the rare occasion (was sick recently and threw everything out the window, long hot bath, lemon shower-gel’d the hair), but no where near as much as I did before.
My balding crown is practically gone now.

Not sure how well my method works with curly hair, my hair for the most part is pretty straight.

The biggest part of no-poo (Cornflour/water only), is building your own routine that works for you, some observations I noticed;

  • If the hairs still super greasy, put a bit more flour at the roots (not tips) and massage it in to force it to calm down (This is the hardest part, training your scalp).
    Note: This works best at night just before bed, when you wake if there was excessive flour, you won’t see/notice it, night time movement/sweats will see to that. Tend to wake up with lovely looking/feeling air.
  • If it’s itchy, moisten (not drench) your scalp a bit; Wet your hands and give it a good massage at the roots.
  • If it’s still dry in general, put some oil/hair-oil serum on there + dip a comb in water and run it through a few times.
  • If it’s two tone (light at tips, dark at the roots above the neckline), apply some heat and brush well to redistribute the hair oil to cover all the hair and not just the roots - Boar bristle brush is good for this.
    Note: When I say apply oil (olive/hair/serum etc) to the hair, I mean literally like a pea drop in the palm, rub hands together, then rub it into the hair strands. Don’t just pour half a cup in your hands and go nuts.
  • If it’s dark/heavy all over, like day #1 bad; I mean truly greasy to the feel - I tend to flour up a little at the roots and then run it through a heat source. The flour binds to the grease, which burns/drys and drops out during heat-treatment, and the excess moisture (trapped in by the grease) gets evaporated.